Linux

Linux - No space left on device, yet plenty of free space

My little server ran into an issue, and started reporting the error: No space left on device No worries, lest figure out which disk has full and clean up… Using the df command with the -h (for human-readable output) it should be easy to find the issue: root@server:~# df -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on udev 483M 0 483M 0% /dev tmpfs 100M 3.1M 97M 4% /run /dev/vda 20G 9.

Watching your Raspberry Pi

So I’ve installed a Raspberry Pi and it’s been running smoothly day in, day out. I’d like it to stay that way, but as the server is running it’s gathers lint in log files, databases grows and knowing how the load on CPU and memory is utilized through out time, I was looking for a tool which could help me to solve this problem. As fun as it might be to build your own solution, I’ve learned to appreciate ready to use solutions, and it seems a nice little tool is available called RPi-Monitor.

Sending mail from a droplet

As stated earlier this site is now running on a DigitalOcean droplet. A droplet is basically the same as having a “real server”, and when running a bare bones machine, it isn’t born with the ability to handle email - receiving nor sending. As a number of web apps require the ability to handle mail, I had to setup facilities on the server (or droplet) to handle mail. The “default” way to do this would probably be to install sendmail or postfix, as they are full-featured mail server, but configuring a mail-server, keeping it secure and updated is a nightmare I’d like to avoid.

Server setup: A user account

So, I’ve been moving the site to a VPS - a Virtual Private Server. A VPS is basically the same as a physical server to which you can’t have physical access. When you get your virtual server, most likely it will be setup with a basic disk image with an Operating System and a root account. In my case at DigitalOcean I choose to setup an Ubuntu Linux image and here are the first moves you should take after creating the VPS to get the basic security in place.