Security

Get your DMARC going

Get your company implementing DMARC now… During the past 5-6 years email industry efforts have been pushing the DMARC standard along. It provides the best widely supported and seemingly efficient way to - as a domain-owner - protect the domain from misuse and abuse in terms of spam and phishing attacks. As sending email has often been a wild-west, and knowing who is a valid sender of email may prove a challenge for many companies - and as most IT developers does seem to care too much about the finer details of email (and production just as bad email headers as HTML markup :-) ), implementing DMARC protection on your domain may actually be a challenge.

Updating Viscocity certificates (on mac osx)

When using Viscocity to connect to a corporate network or any other openVPN server, you’re probably using certificates with a reasonable lifetime, but sometimes the certificate expire and needs be updated. Replacing the certificate files through the Viscocity interface is quite easy - just edit the connection and replace the certificate files in the appropriate tab. There is however another little trick, which may need to be applied before the new certificates work.

Password failure in Wordpress Plugin

One of the great features of Wordpress is the wide variety of plugins available. They often enable a lot of interesting functionality and integrations to other services not native to Wordpress itself. Most of these plugins are developed by individuals or small teams independent of the core community - and often not with a keen interest in security, but an exclusive focus on “making stuff work”. I’ve been using the Wordpress “Google AdSense Dashboard” for awhile, and after the recent host of password leaks, I’ve been changing and upgrading password all around.

HTTPS, SSL, TLS - What it does

While surfing the net, you often come across web agencies how promote SSL-certificates (or TLS security) on their products - or their ability to create “secure web applications” with SSL. Most users know HTTPS/SSL/TLS as the little lock, that promises “security” when visiting a page - but what kind of security it actually provides is rarely explained - and far worse often misunderstood. The while SSL is the popular name (and as it was once known) and HTTPS usually is the way users sees it (as part of a URL in a browser) - the correct name is TLS a short for Transport Layer Security.

Ubunutu Uncomplicated Firewall

I’m still enjoying the fresh new Ubunutu 9.04, and one of the nice new features is a firewall – which Canonical calls “Uncomplicated Firewall”. I’m usually not hooked on firewalls, but just for the fun of it I enabled the firewall on my laptop and it seems to work quite well. The firewall doesn’t seem to have any noticeable impact on system performance and as the laptop from time to time visits open wifi’s, it’s probably a good idea to have protection from other users on open networks.