Category Archives: Desktop Apps

Viewing EML files

As mails bounch around some email programs (I’m looking at you, Microsoft), seems to encrypt package forwarded mails in attachments with the extension .eml.

On Linux…

While Mozilla Thunderbird should be able to read them (as should Evolution), it requires you have the mail  application available on your machine, but I haven’t – I’m doing just fine with GMail in the browser. So far the best solution I’ve find – assuming it’s trivial non-sensitive, personal files – that an Online viewer seems to work pretty well. My preferred solution is the free one from encryptomatic. It handles the mails quite nicely, it restores the formatting to something quite readable and even handles embedded images and attachments within the eml-file.

On Windows…

If you’re using Windows Live Mail or any other mail application running on windows, it can probably handle the .eml files. An other option is to look for an App, as there seems to exist several apps on windows, which renders the .eml files with no issues.

A little trick (with a browser)

When using windows – even in a VirtualBox – there’s an easy little trick you can use: Save the file and simply rename the file extension from “.eml” to “.mht” and open the file with Internet Explorer. It should render perfectly.

Once the .eml file is renamed to .mht Google Chrome and Firefox seems able to render the contents too – though handling images and attachments seems much less graceful.

Updating Viscocity certificates (on mac osx)

When using Viscocity to connect to a corporate network or any other openVPN server, you’re probably using certificates with a reasonable lifetime, but sometimes the certificate expire and needs be updated. Replacing the certificate files through the Viscocity interface is quite easy – just edit the connection and replace the certificate files in the appropriate tab.

There is however another little trick, which may need to be applied before the new certificates work. Viscocity offers to save the certificate password in the Keychain and I choose to use this feature, which caused a bit of trouble when updating the certificate. While it ought to – Viscocity does not – clear the password, when the certificate is changed, so to get prompted you need to go into the Keychain access tool and delete the stored password.

Look for an entry looking something like the highlighted line below and delete the occurrence.
Screen Shot 2014-09-09 at 23.04.07

 

Connection debugging tip

Viscocity provides a detailed log, which makes it much easier to debug connection issues. In the OSX Menu bar, right click the Viscocity icon, then choose “Details”. This opens a details window where a the button bar. The button to the right allows you to see a fairly detailed log of what Viscocity is doing, and provides clues on what to fix. In the screenshot below, it’s a wrong certificate password issue (“private-key-password-failure”).

viscocity_log

Salvaging a deleted message from Thunderbird

undeleteSuppose you got an important mail, but by accident deleted the message – and to make matters worse, you also decided that emptying the mailbox was a pretty neat idea. Is then time to Panic?

Well it might, but there is a chance you might be able to undelete the message – and quite easily if you’re on a Mac or a Linux machine. Here are the few steps, which has helped recover a lost mail or two… First close Thunderbird. Then located the mail directory (on Linux it’s located in the subdirectory .mozilla-thunderbird in you home directory – on windows most likely somewhere in C:\Documents and Settings\*\Application Data\Thunderbird – In there you’re looking for the “Local Folders” directory.

If you’re on a Mac or Linux type the following:

cat Trash | grep -v X-Mozilla- > Restored

The cat command prints all the line in the file Trash – not to the screen, but as input to grep. Grep is used to find all lines not begining with “X-Mozilla-“ and prints these – and the greater than makes the print go to a new file called Restored.

Once this is done exit the directory and restart Thunderbird. You should now be able to find a new folder called “Restored” and a lot of old mail. Find the message you need to restore, and drag it into the inbox or wherever you need it – then delete the “Restored” folder.

If you’re on windows you need to do a little more work. The trick happening with the command line above, is that all lines beginning with “X-Mozilla-” is deleted and thus restored from their deleted state. A suitable editor might do the trick.

Do notice, that the Trash folder may be quite large, if you haven’t run the “Compact Folders” in quite a while – and if you did do that after deleting the message you’re trying to restore, then it’s probably gone for good.

Office: remove hidden data

Microsoft Office has gotten a lot of nice and helpful features in the latest version. One of the nice features is virtually unlimited undo capabilities. Unfortunately this feature can also leave some tracks for recipients of your documents – a new tool from Microsoft lets you clean your office documents before further distribution.
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